Crossways Community in Tunbridge Wells said yesterday [Tuesday] it was ‘delighted’ with the news that the Government will not be appealing a High Court ruling that deemed Personal Independence Payment (PIP) regulations to be ‘blatantly discriminatory’.

Crossways CEO Christopher Munday said: “This is a huge victory for people with mental health problems.

“Our residents will benefit from this ruling and we will ensure they get the support they need to travel to appointments, see friends and family and manage to live as independently as possible.”

Regulations introduced in March prevented an award of the higher PIP mobility rate if someone could not take a familiar journey on their own unless it was ‘for reasons other than psychological distress’.

In a case brought by Public Law Project the Judge ruled the regulations were unlawful.

“More than 160,000 people will now be able to access support they should have been entitled to all along,” said Mr Munday.

Disabilities Minister Sarah Newton said: “We are working to change the PIP assessment guide so that we can implement the judgement.

“Once we have completed this exercise we will be carrying out an administrative exercise to review cases that may be eligible and ensure that claimants receive the correct award.”

Crossways Community is a Christian charity that provides residential care and support for adults aged 18-65 with acute mental health issues.