A tribute to six million Holocaust victims was held at the War Memorial in Tunbridge Wells on Saturday [27 January].

Members of the public honoured those who lost their lives under the Nazi regime during the Second World War and subsequent genocides in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur.

The tradition of Holocaust Memorial Day began 20 years ago, in a ceremony attended by Germans who came to Britain on the last Kindertransport, the organised rescue effort that saw many Jewish children evacuated from Europe. It has since become an annual event.

Royal British Legion secretary and spokesperson, Jennifer Watts, delivered a speech on behalf of the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust [HMDT] and the importance of commemorating the day.

The Trust believes that: “Holocaust Memorial Day is a time when we seek to learn the lessons of the past and to recognise that genocide does not just take place on its own.

“It is a steady process which can begin if discrimination, racism and hatred are not checked and prevented.”

The ceremony was attended by members of the Royal British Legion and sea cadets from TS Brilliant.

The Mayor of Tunbridge Wells, Cllr Julia Soyke, laid a bunch of white lilies to honour the victims.